Socially Acceptable Lesson 14

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Socially Acceptable Lesson 14

Different cultures

In South Africa we are known as the “rainbow nation”. We have so many different cultures, beliefs, political views, religions, races and traditions in this country. Our differences range from different languages (11 official mother tongues), colourful dress codes, foods, marriage customs, funeral customs, etc. But although we do things differently, we are all still proudly South African.

In John 3:16 we read: “For God so loved the WORLD …” So He did not only love part of it or only some of the people. He loved the entire world.

In the Old Testament we read how God delivered the Israelites from the Egyptians. They were the enemy of God’s people, worshipping other gods and causing a lot of hurt, but God still remained concerned and merciful towards them. In Jeremiah 46:26 we read: “But later on, people will live in Egypt again, as they did in times past. I, the LORD, have spoken.” This shows us that there is hope for “others” who are different from us, because God is merciful to all humankind.

Different culture
Abdul and Yusuf are brothers, the only two Muslims in a small private school. They live in a remote area where there are no Muslim schools. The other children are Christians. The culture of these two boys, their beliefs, way of dress and food are very different from the rest. While the other kids get sandwiches, pizzas and hotdogs for lunch, Abdul and Yusuf get bowls of curry, roti’s, samoosas, biryani and bunny chows. The Muslim parents have already chosen the girls Abdul and Yusuf should marry after completing their studies.

The kids at school tease and laugh at them for eating smelly spicy foods, for wearing those “silly little hats” and because they have to pray so many times a day. The brothers feel unwelcome and alienated. They hate going to school and it is affecting their performance at school. They have not told their parents how the other children are treating them.


Group discussion

  1. Identify the in this story.
  2. Is it right to let people feel unwelcome or make fun of them because of their religion, skin colour, dress code or any other differences? Why not?
  3. If you were Abdul and Yusuf, how would you feel about the Christian children and their faith?
  4. What were the rights and responsibilities of both the Christian and the Muslim children in the school? How could they have shown respect to each other, despite the differences?
  5. Read about the vision that God gave Peter in Acts 10:9-23.
    • What do you think is the meaning of this vision?
    • What kind of attitude is required if we want to draw people of different cultures and religions to the Christian faith?
  6. Do you have a responsibility to eat healthy foods? And do you think it is necessary to pray at every meal? Why?






Sections

Different cultures

In South Africa we are known as the “rainbow nation”. We have so many different cultures, beliefs, political views, religions, races and traditions in this country. Our differences range from different languages (11 official mother tongues), colourful dress codes, foods, marriage customs, funeral customs, etc. But although we do things differently, we are all still proudly South African.

In John 3:16 we read: “For God so loved the WORLD …” So He did not only love part of it or only some of the people. He loved the entire world.

In the Old Testament we read how God delivered the Israelites from the Egyptians. They were the enemy of God’s people, worshipping other gods and causing a lot of hurt, but God still remained concerned and merciful towards them. In Jeremiah 46:26 we read: “But later on, people will live in Egypt again, as they did in times past. I, the LORD, have spoken.” This shows us that there is hope for “others” who are different from us, because God is merciful to all humankind.

Different culture
Abdul and Yusuf are brothers, the only two Muslims in a small private school. They live in a remote area where there are no Muslim schools. The other children are Christians. The culture of these two boys, their beliefs, way of dress and food are very different from the rest. While the other kids get sandwiches, pizzas and hotdogs for lunch, Abdul and Yusuf get bowls of curry, roti’s, samoosas, biryani and bunny chows. The Muslim parents have already chosen the girls Abdul and Yusuf should marry after completing their studies.

The kids at school tease and laugh at them for eating smelly spicy foods, for wearing those “silly little hats” and because they have to pray so many times a day. The brothers feel unwelcome and alienated. They hate going to school and it is affecting their performance at school. They have not told their parents how the other children are treating them.

Group discussion

  1. Identify the in this story.
  2. Is it right to let people feel unwelcome or make fun of them because of their religion, skin colour, dress code or any other differences? Why not?
  3. If you were Abdul and Yusuf, how would you feel about the Christian children and their faith?
  4. What were the rights and responsibilities of both the Christian and the Muslim children in the school? How could they have shown respect to each other, despite the differences?
  5. Read about the vision that God gave Peter in Acts 10:9-23.
    • What do you think is the meaning of this vision?
    • What kind of attitude is required if we want to draw people of different cultures and religions to the Christian faith?
  6. Do you have a responsibility to eat healthy foods? And do you think it is necessary to pray at every meal? Why?

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