My pledge Lesson 9

Picture of Life Skills

My pledge Lesson 9

My pledge 9

  • I am a proud South African and will embrace my country’s wonderful history, heritage and culture.
  • I will remember that, as a nation with different races and cultures, united we shall stand, but divided we shall fall.

What does the Bible say?

  • History (Deuteronomy 6:10-25)
  • Heritage (Psalm 16:1-6)
  • Cultures (1 Corinthians 9:19-23)

Group discussion

  1. What does this pledge mean to you?
  2. How much do you know about the South African history? What is the most important and the most interesting part of that history for you?
  3. In Deuteronomy 6 the people of Israel are urged to teach their children about the wonderful things the Lord had done for them in their history.
    1. Why was it important (see verse 12)?
    2. Do you think we teach enough history to our children in South Africa? If we don’t teach them their history, what will be the result?
  4. Share two fascinating facts about the culture and history of your own family.
  5. How much do you miss seeing your family and being part of your culture and heritage?
  6. Read Psalm 16:1-6 in the group.
    1. The Psalm talks about a delightful inheritance, about the wonderful portion the writer had received from the Lord. What did this heritage mean to him?
    2. Are there some aspects of your own family history and heritage for which you can praise the Lord? Then do it!
    3. If you feel that your family had a negative influence on you, how will you deal with it today? Can you bring it to the Lord and forgive them?
  7. Is there a mixture of different cultures in your prison cell or among the people you interact with daily? How difficult does this make things for you personally?
  8. Do you show respect and learn from them, or do you treat them with disrespect and sometimes make fun of them?
  9. How would you introduce Jesus to people from other cultures?
  10. In 1 Corinthians 9:19-23 Paul explains how he lived among people of different cultures and tried to win them for Christ. Read the passage.
    1. Which principles do you learn from Paul for living among people of other cultures and for sharing the goods news of Jesus with them?
    2. What would happen in the prison and in the community if people of different cultures would treat each other in this way?

Interesting facts about South Africa

South Africa has many different cultures with many types of traditional foods. Examples of popular dishes are snoek, sosaties, curries, bobotie, mopani worms, mieliepap, boerewors, biltong, bunny chow, fricadelle, malva pudding, koeksisters and, the most popular of all, potjiekos and braaivleis.

Then we have special sauces like tomato sauce, chilli mayonnaise sauce, braai sauce, curry sauce fish tartare sauce and sweet fruit juice sauces and custards.

Every year a Table of Peace and Unity is set up on Table Mountain. Hundreds of celebrities, dignitaries, religious leaders and members of the public gather at a long table to eat a meal together in the spirit of Ubuntu. At the table, everyone partaking of the meal can pray and break bread together while enjoying one another’s company. The event symbolises unity across different cultures, races and backgrounds.

Activity

If you could sit at a Table of Unity today, what would you like to see served? What is your favourite food? What food do you miss most in prison? Is your mouth watering at the memories of the foods you love and now cannot eat?
Tell each other.








Sections

My pledge 9

  • I am a proud South African and will embrace my country’s wonderful history, heritage and culture.
  • I will remember that, as a nation with different races and cultures, united we shall stand, but divided we shall fall.

What does the Bible say?

  • History (Deuteronomy 6:10-25)
  • Heritage (Psalm 16:1-6)
  • Cultures (1 Corinthians 9:19-23)

Group discussion

  1. What does this pledge mean to you?
  2. How much do you know about the South African history? What is the most important and the most interesting part of that history for you?
  3. In Deuteronomy 6 the people of Israel are urged to teach their children about the wonderful things the Lord had done for them in their history.
    1. Why was it important (see verse 12)?
    2. Do you think we teach enough history to our children in South Africa? If we don’t teach them their history, what will be the result?
  4. Share two fascinating facts about the culture and history of your own family.
  5. How much do you miss seeing your family and being part of your culture and heritage?
  6. Read Psalm 16:1-6 in the group.
    1. The Psalm talks about a delightful inheritance, about the wonderful portion the writer had received from the Lord. What did this heritage mean to him?
    2. Are there some aspects of your own family history and heritage for which you can praise the Lord? Then do it!
    3. If you feel that your family had a negative influence on you, how will you deal with it today? Can you bring it to the Lord and forgive them?
  7. Is there a mixture of different cultures in your prison cell or among the people you interact with daily? How difficult does this make things for you personally?
  8. Do you show respect and learn from them, or do you treat them with disrespect and sometimes make fun of them?
  9. How would you introduce Jesus to people from other cultures?
  10. In 1 Corinthians 9:19-23 Paul explains how he lived among people of different cultures and tried to win them for Christ. Read the passage.
    1. Which principles do you learn from Paul for living among people of other cultures and for sharing the goods news of Jesus with them?
    2. What would happen in the prison and in the community if people of different cultures would treat each other in this way?

Interesting facts about South Africa

South Africa has many different cultures with many types of traditional foods. Examples of popular dishes are snoek, sosaties, curries, bobotie, mopani worms, mieliepap, boerewors, biltong, bunny chow, fricadelle, malva pudding, koeksisters and, the most popular of all, potjiekos and braaivleis.

Then we have special sauces like tomato sauce, chilli mayonnaise sauce, braai sauce, curry sauce fish tartare sauce and sweet fruit juice sauces and custards.

Every year a Table of Peace and Unity is set up on Table Mountain. Hundreds of celebrities, dignitaries, religious leaders and members of the public gather at a long table to eat a meal together in the spirit of Ubuntu. At the table, everyone partaking of the meal can pray and break bread together while enjoying one another’s company. The event symbolises unity across different cultures, races and backgrounds.

Activity

If you could sit at a Table of Unity today, what would you like to see served? What is your favourite food? What food do you miss most in prison? Is your mouth watering at the memories of the foods you love and now cannot eat?
Tell each other.

© Missio 2024 | All rights reserved.