My pledge Lesson 15

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My pledge Lesson 15

My pledge 15

  • I will let go of my anger, guard my mouth and think before I speak.

What does the Bible say?

  • Anger (Psalm 4:4; Proverbs 15:1; Ephesians 4:25-32)
  • Guarding your tongue (James 3:1-12)

Group discussion

  1. What does this pledge mean to you?
  2. Think back of a time when you said something that you regretted long afterwards. How would the situation have ended differently if you had thought about your words before you spoke?
  3. What were the most hurtful words ever said to you?
  4. Who said them to you? How did the words make you feel, and how did they affect the rest of your life?
  5. A word said in anger can destroy someone’s life. Then again, a word never spoken can also destroy a life. Can you think of such words, for example “I love you” or “I need you”?
  6. On a scale of 1 to 10, how angry are you inside?
  7. Is anger really a sin? Discuss what Paul says in Ephesians 4:25-32.
    1. What does it mean when Paul says: “When you become angry, do not let your anger lead you into sin, and do not stay angry all day” (verse 26)?
    2. How do you get rid of all bitterness, passion and anger (verse 31)?
    3. What is the opposite of anger, shouting and insults according to verse 32?
    4. We make the Holy Spirit sad when we insult and hurt other people (verse 30). What attitude does the Spirit give us (Galatians 5:22)?
  8. Who do you need to apologise to for something hurtful you have done or said? How can you guard your mouth (Ephesians 4:25, 29; Proverbs 15:1)?
  9. Are you ready to forgive someone who said or did hurtful things to you (Ephesians 4:32; 5:1)? Letting go is not easy, but possible.
  10. There is terrible power in the tongue. Read and discuss James 3:1-12.
    1. To what does James compare the tongue (verse 6)?
    2. Have you seen examples of how the tongue can be like a small flame that sets a whole forest on fire? Share your stories in the group.
    3. If negative words have been spoken about you, or if you have spoken negative words about others, pray for those words to be cancelled, and speak positive words in their place. Will you pray for someone who has shared your experience?

Interesting facts about South Africa

Here are three examples of South Africa’s dancing heritage:
The Cape Minstrels (better known as the Kaapse Klopse) are unique to Cape Town. Every year on 2 January, also known as Second New Year, about 13 000 musicians and performers dress up in bright, multi-coloured outfits and dance through the city’s streets, twirling their umbrellas and playing jazz instruments accompanied by loud drum beats. The Cape Minstrels’ celebration has been shaped by the Cape’s history and by the coloured communities of the Western Cape.

The riel folk dance also has its roots in the coloured community. The theme of the dance is “the dogs are biting me”, and it consists of hopping, quick feet movement, and jumping over things like walking sticks. The women wear long dresses while the men wear waistcoats with bow ties. The dance is more like a theatre performance and tells a short story. In Calvinia in the Northern Cape, riel dance-offs are performed by small groups. The cheering of the crowd determines which group wins. These dance-offs attract many tourists to the town.

In many South African communities, traditional gumboot dancing is still a very popular activity. It is performed by dancers wearing Wellington boots, and involves jumping, singing in unison, clapping hands and smacking the boots for a powerful sound effect. The dancers use their whole bodies to perform. Many years ago, black mine labourers came up with gumboot dancing as an alternative to drumming, which was restricted during the apartheid era.

Activity

Share with the class your favourite or cultural heritage dance moves.








Sections

My pledge 15

  • I will let go of my anger, guard my mouth and think before I speak.

What does the Bible say?

  • Anger (Psalm 4:4; Proverbs 15:1; Ephesians 4:25-32)
  • Guarding your tongue (James 3:1-12)

Group discussion

  1. What does this pledge mean to you?
  2. Think back of a time when you said something that you regretted long afterwards. How would the situation have ended differently if you had thought about your words before you spoke?
  3. What were the most hurtful words ever said to you?
  4. Who said them to you? How did the words make you feel, and how did they affect the rest of your life?
  5. A word said in anger can destroy someone’s life. Then again, a word never spoken can also destroy a life. Can you think of such words, for example “I love you” or “I need you”?
  6. On a scale of 1 to 10, how angry are you inside?
  7. Is anger really a sin? Discuss what Paul says in Ephesians 4:25-32.
    1. What does it mean when Paul says: “When you become angry, do not let your anger lead you into sin, and do not stay angry all day” (verse 26)?
    2. How do you get rid of all bitterness, passion and anger (verse 31)?
    3. What is the opposite of anger, shouting and insults according to verse 32?
    4. We make the Holy Spirit sad when we insult and hurt other people (verse 30). What attitude does the Spirit give us (Galatians 5:22)?
  8. Who do you need to apologise to for something hurtful you have done or said? How can you guard your mouth (Ephesians 4:25, 29; Proverbs 15:1)?
  9. Are you ready to forgive someone who said or did hurtful things to you (Ephesians 4:32; 5:1)? Letting go is not easy, but possible.
  10. There is terrible power in the tongue. Read and discuss James 3:1-12.
    1. To what does James compare the tongue (verse 6)?
    2. Have you seen examples of how the tongue can be like a small flame that sets a whole forest on fire? Share your stories in the group.
    3. If negative words have been spoken about you, or if you have spoken negative words about others, pray for those words to be cancelled, and speak positive words in their place. Will you pray for someone who has shared your experience?

Interesting facts about South Africa

Here are three examples of South Africa’s dancing heritage:
The Cape Minstrels (better known as the Kaapse Klopse) are unique to Cape Town. Every year on 2 January, also known as Second New Year, about 13 000 musicians and performers dress up in bright, multi-coloured outfits and dance through the city’s streets, twirling their umbrellas and playing jazz instruments accompanied by loud drum beats. The Cape Minstrels’ celebration has been shaped by the Cape’s history and by the coloured communities of the Western Cape.

The riel folk dance also has its roots in the coloured community. The theme of the dance is “the dogs are biting me”, and it consists of hopping, quick feet movement, and jumping over things like walking sticks. The women wear long dresses while the men wear waistcoats with bow ties. The dance is more like a theatre performance and tells a short story. In Calvinia in the Northern Cape, riel dance-offs are performed by small groups. The cheering of the crowd determines which group wins. These dance-offs attract many tourists to the town.

In many South African communities, traditional gumboot dancing is still a very popular activity. It is performed by dancers wearing Wellington boots, and involves jumping, singing in unison, clapping hands and smacking the boots for a powerful sound effect. The dancers use their whole bodies to perform. Many years ago, black mine labourers came up with gumboot dancing as an alternative to drumming, which was restricted during the apartheid era.

Activity

Share with the class your favourite or cultural heritage dance moves.

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